We the People
Native Americans and Early Explorers


  General Information

Description:
Operating under the premise that the United States is the result of all that has gone before us…we will spend approximately six weeks (regular classroom) and 9 weeks (gifted/talented classroom) studying the effects of Native Americans on the development of our country today and the effects early European explorers had on Native Americans and the subsequent development of the country.
Grade Level Grade 5 Topic Social Studies--Indians and Explorers & cultural leaders
Creators Sharon Boots
Suzie Jenney
Geographic Area North America

  Time Period 38,000-8,000BC to early 1600's
  Duration 6-9 weeks
  Academic Standards SS 5.1.1; SS 5.1.2; SS 5.1.3; SS 5.1.4; SS 5.1.6; SS 5.1.7; SS 5.1.19; SS 5.1.21; SS 5.3.1; SS 5.3.2; SS 5.3.3; SS 5.3.6; SS 5.3.7; SS 5.3.9; SS 5.3.10; SS 5.3.11; SS 5.4.1; SS 5.5.1; SS 5.5.5 (Note:  If the teacher includes a Language Arts Block with this unit as intended, then many of the Literacy Standards are covered as well.)

Standards Tapestry Files

Click on the images below for actual size



  Click on the images for actual size


Assessment Rationale

Teacher Observation:  Teacher /students will read Native American stories and discuss how people adapted to and changed the environment

Comparison Chart: used to compare Indian groups and European explorers, and land use by native Americans.

Short Answer Test- given after Native American and European Explorers 

Map Activity- Give each student a copy of a blank map of North America.  Ask them to locate tribes in each region of the US and the Arctic and key physical features.  Do the same for European explorers.

Timeline- Each child or small group will be responsible for creating a graphic representation for major people and developments displayed on an ongoing timeline in the classroom

Projects- Students will choose from t he list of projects to illustrate their learning during the unit

Navigation

5.1.1
5.1.2
5.1.3
5.1.4
5.1.6
5.1.7
5.1.19
5.1.21
5.2.1
5.3.1
5.3.2
5.3.3
5.3.6
5.3.7
5.3.9
5.3.10
5.3.11
5.4.1
5.5.1
5.5.5


 














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Instructional Plan
American Natives and European Explorers is a six-week inquiry study intended to accommodate all of the differentiation in a regular heterogeneous 5th grade classroom or a gifted and talented classroom.  Each day's session is geared to a 45-60 minute period, but there are times when is needed and the teacher will have to use part of his/her reading or writing block in addition to the allotted time for Social Studies to complete activities.

Although many web sites have been included to help the teacher with this unit, it should be noted that each Indian tribe has its own home page in most cases.  There are literally hundreds of sources available on the web that have not been listed.  The biggest problem is to sort through these sites well before the unit of study begins to get the best ones for the students.  Of course printed resources at the library should not be overlooked.

In this particular unit the students will be given the following tribes to choose from for their research:

Northeast: Iroquois (Onandagas, Senecas, Mohawks, Oneidas, Cavagas)

Southeast: Seminoles, Cherokees, Creek

Midwest:   Potawatomies, Shawnees, Eries, Arapaho, Mandan, Cheyenne, Sioux, Blackfoot, Arapaho, Crow, Ojibwa, Pawnee

Northwest:  Kwakiutl, Modocs, Nez Perces, Shoshones

Southwest: Pueblo, Hopi, Navajo, Zuni. Apache, Comanches

West:  Ute, Shoshone, Pomo,            

Sub-Artic: Cree, Beaver, Chipewyan, Carrier, Beothuk

Artic: Aleut, Iglulik, Inuits. Tlingit

The number of tribes covered will depend on the ability of the students involved.  For a regular heterogeneous classroom, it is feasible to break the class into 5 groups with each group responsible for all the tribes in that region.  All the members of the group could research each tribe, or the research could be divided among group members so that each member was responsible for only one tribe. A gifted and talented classroom could cover more tribes or go into more depth in their study in the same amount of time.  A learning disabled student could be assigned just one or two questions to answer for a particular tribe.

Before research begins, a list of questions to be answered must be generated.  Teacher direction will be needed to assure students' questions are broad enough and will generate pertinent information.  Display the Big Ideas and Guiding Questions in a prominent part of the classroom.  (See the Big Idea and Guiding Questions/Standards previously listed.) 

Discussion also needs to occur about taking notes when doing research.   One method that is useful is to have students record the main idea of their information in “short, chop, chop” English (not complete sentences) on 3x5 cards that have the following information: in the upper right hand corner, student's initials; upper left hand corner, the code letter the student has assigned each question he/she is attempting to answer.

After all of the research is culminated, students need to decide how to present their research.  This can be done in small groups or as an individual effort, using Powerpoint or a more traditional/oral presentation. The following list of activities may be helpful but should not exclude other original student ideas:

Verbal Linguistic

Write: a poem, newspaper article, a speech from the perspective of a Native American, a play or skit, a crossword puzzle, or letter, create a journal/diary

Speak: Give a speech on the issues of the time period, share ideas with class or in a small group

Logical/Mathematical

Use a graphic organizer to display research; create a timeline and sequence events; create a graph

Visual; Spatial

Make a collage of pictures and information; make a travel brochure; design or decorate clothes/jewelry; design postcards/stamp; make a mobile, poster, sculpture, or puppets; make a sand painting; build or draw in 3D an artifact of your tribe's culture

Musical/Rhythmic

Write/sing a song or jingle using your research; make and/or play an instrument from the time period; listen to music of various Native American cultures

Bodily/Kinesthetic

Choreograph and perform an authentic tribal dance; perform a pantomime; perform a skit or play; build a model village

Naturalist

Take a nature hike in which you identify plants associated with your tribe (photograph your hike and findings); Learn how your tribe used plants for food and medicine

Interpersonal

Debate an issue that affects the tribe you researched; take part in a team project

Intrapersonal

Describe your feelings of any of the ideas or events you encounter in your research

Humanities-rich Resources

Type (book link, etc.)
Name
URL (if any)
Annotation (can include description and notes on how to use.

Link

Movie: Hopi Prophecy

http://www.ihc4u.org/htgNA.htm

Humanities Council

Link

Our Documents

http://ourdocuments.gov/

100 Primary Resources

Link

Council of Humanities-movies on loan

http://www.ihc4u.org/htgNA.htm

17 resources-Native American history and culture

Link

Tribal Index

http://www.curtis-collection.com

Tribal customs-80 native American tribes

Link

Information about current Indian issues and people in charge

http://www.ncai.org/index.asp


Link

Native Americans-environment

http://www.cnie.org/NAE/

Wealth of info on how NA used environment

Link

Culture: Indian Resources-Cinderella, art, baskets, etc.

http://www.kstrom.net/


Link

European Explorers

http://www.heritage.nf.ca/exploration/


Link

Kachina Dolls, Dream catchers, Canoes, Totem poles, Tee-pees, Rattles

http://www.enchantedlearning.com/


Book

5th Grade Text

Building a Nation-Scott Foresman


Video


Native Americans: The History of a People- Knowledge Unlimited

25 minutes

Video


Amerindian Legacy-The Phoenix Learning Group

29 minutes

Book

J.B. Harley

MAPS and the Columbian Encounter

Primary Source Maps

Book

Kalman

Famous Native North Americans

Crabtree Pub

Book

Bruchac, J

Native American Stories

Fulcrum Pub

Book

Bruchac, J

Native American Animal Stories

Fulcrum

Book

Caduto and Bruchac, J

Keepers of Life

Fulcrum

Book

O'Dell

Sign of the Beaver

Literature book for 4th grade G/T

Book


Why the Whales Came

Literature book for 5th G/T

Book


Sing Down the Moon

Literature book for 4-5 G/T

Explorers

www.chenowith.k12.or.us/tech/

E. explorers


European explorers

http://librarythinkquest.org/

Why explorers explored

CDrom

Softkey

Explorers of the New World

Animated
Entertaining
Informative

Link

Pictures as primary sources

http://memory.loc.gov/

Use to explain primary sources


Instructional Plan

Instructional Day Description
Day 1
KWL Chart-students fill out to show prior knowledge and what they would like to learn.
Overview of unit (Kidspiration)-How did the first inhabitants get here? Establish the beginning of a year-long timeline of US history.
Day 2

Distribute US maps. Discuss locating places using latitude and longitude. Map activity-have students locate regions of the US and at least three tribes for each region using latitude and longitude lines. In small groups, students discuss physical features of the land that might have influenced tribes…questions that might lead to further research.

Day 3

Divide into five groups, one for each region. Generate a list of questions that you would need to research in order to tell how the tribes from your region were able to adapt to the environment and to live most effectively. The list needs to deal with questions that deal with Indian beliefs that may be of value to us today and questions pertaining to contributions that they made to North America/the world. From that list each needs to include what they think are most important. Introduce 3x5 note card format.

Day 4

Optional: Show video, “Native Americans: The History of a People” (25 minutes)

Day 5

Discuss validity of resources; Research

Day 6

Research

Day 7

Research

Day 8

Research

Day 9

Culmination Activities

Day 10

Culmination Activities

Day 11

Culmination Activities: Optional: Video: “Amerindian Legacy” (29 min.)

Day 12

Map Activity: Then and Now. Compare the regions of the US and list the ways each has changed from the time of the Native Americans. Prediction (essay): Why do you think Indian tribes failed to survive in great numbers?

Day 13

Map Test-locate the five regions of the US and the tribes in each region.

Day 14

Assessment-Essay test-Native Americans

Day 15

Why did Native Americans lose their land? Generate prior knowledge…KWL

Day 16 Divide into five groups…Vikings, French, Spanish, British, Other. Generate a list of questions to research that will answer what relationship these groups had with the Native Americans as well as what their motivation was to settle where they did. Also, what did they contribute to the development of North America? Information generated by each group will be put in a PowerPoint Program. Students will locate important settlements on their maps and will be responsible for information presented in other groups' Powerpoint presentations by filling out a chart that they will use later in skits as assessment.
Day 17

Guided Research-point out URL's and other available resources

Day 18

Research

Day 19

Research

Day 20

Research

Day 21

Research

Day 22

Research/preparation for presentation

Day 23

Presentation

Day 24

Presentation

Day 25

Presentation

Day 26

Culmination-KWL chart completion

Day 27

Culmination-Impromptu skit to show knowledge learned

Day 28

Teacher directed: Primary Source-Iroquois+ U.S. Constitution-Comparison

Day 29

President Jackson's removal of Indians

Day 30

Assessment


Native American Essay Test (Pre-Post) 30-45 Minutes

Directions: Pick a tribe (s) you have researched and on another piece of paper answer at least three (3) of the following questions:

1. How did the environment influence the development of the tribe?

2.  What lasting contribution did the tribe make to life as we know it?

3. What religious beliefs or beliefs about nature did your tribe have that are of value to us today?

4. How was the tribe you chose influenced by the European Explorers?

5. What is the status of your tribe today?

European Explorers Chart—Students will fill in information as it presented to them in other PowerPoint presentations.

Impromptu Skit: Give each group of explorers a number (example: French #1, British #2, etc.) Number class off using numbers 1-5; numbers correspond to explorer groups; students meet in their new groups and using their notes, they will plan a skit that shows all the knowledge gained.

Instructional Plan Files


top

Student picture 1Classroom Implementation Notes

Links to other student pictures

Picture 1
Picture 2
Picture 3
Picture 4

Student PowerPoint Presentations

Navajo
Nez Perce
Cherokee Indians
Midwest Indians
Iroquois Indians
Indian Sign Language Guide

 

Teacher Inquiry Kiosk





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